dealsagt compact obd-ii can diagnostic code reader…

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Looks like a good product, but is it really a deal? Amazon has the same thing for 50 cents more. I know you have to spend $35 or be a member of Prime to get the free shipping.

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I don't know about the brand. But having an OBD scanner is really handy if you are able to make some small repairs on your own.

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I've had another brand for several years, so I can't speak to the quality of this one. However, it's an extremely useful tool, if for no other reason than being able to talk intelligently with your established repair place and not being manipulated by a place you know nothing about. I simply keep mine in the car.

It also can be useful for diagnosing and fixing the problem yourself, as the light could reflect something as simple as a missing gas cap. For example, recently the check engine light on my wife's Outback came on -- at first intermittently, then steadily. My code reader showed P0026 and P0028.

A Google search indicated this was a bilateral "Intake Valve Control Solenoid" problem. A further search suggested that it could be related to an oil pressure issue. So, the logical (and easiest) thing to do first was to check the engine oil level. Sure enough, it was way, way low. (I'll save for another time my speculation about why that happened.)

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@strider300: I think you answered you own question
$16.49 + free shipping Vs. $16.99 + $5.50 shipping
Sounds like a good deal to me

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Ack... Get this:
http://www.amazon.com/BrainyTrade-ELM327-Bluetooth-CAN-BUS-Diagnostic/dp/B008TL6RT0/

And the Torque app for Android. Beats the snot out of any "diagnostic" OBD2 device.

I wish Bully Dog and others would make apps for iPhones and Androids, but I suppose the (Droid at least) market doesn't like a $300 App.

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wish the above Bluetooth also supported iPhone.

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@thormj: Did you read the reviews for the item you recommended ? It seems you have a 1-in-4 chance of getting one that doesn't work or worse screws up your car's electric system. Don't like those odds.

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These scanners are hit or miss depending on the type and age of the OBD-II system. I had one for example that would only read one of the 4 cars that I had while I owned it. In researching why, I found that the cheaper models like this tend to not read the full spectrum of cars. It's takes the more expensive ones to be universal.

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@thormj: I've got a similar bluetooth adapter. it's a little larger but was only about $8. and I have torque on my android Galaxy S3. works like a charm. It can give all kinds of data, and pull codes/clear CEL.

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@chrisautrey: ODB-II is universal. The only variant is JODB from Japan and that is still 99.9% the same. EODB is exactly the same as American ODB-II.

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I have 2 of the ELM327 Bluetooth scanners, and both work perfectly. I just keep each one plugged into the car all the time, and use torque to keep track of gas mileage and other things. I think I paid less than $35 total for both adapters and torque.

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@themcnasty: I should have been more clear. I agree with you it is supposed to be universal, but when you dig into it, these cheaper readers will not check the full range of OBD-II vehicles. This means that even though they are OBD-II scanners in name, it means that either they do not meet that standard to work on all the vehicle makers stuff or there are differences in how it is implemented across vehicle manufacturers. You can see it in the comments on the site's page where people take it and it works fine for one car but not for others, and let's be honest, it's pretty hard to screw up using these things. If someone is serious about this capability, they are better off spending more than bottom dollar to ensure they get a tool that works.

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Just in general, and echoing above posters, having one of these things is great.

They allow you to price your own parts and look up procedures online to see if something that needs replacing is a do-at-home job or a take-it-to-the-mechanic. It also lets you clear codes so you know if the problem is real or not -- O2 sensors are the worst offenders. I had a shop AND a parts store tell me I needed everything from a fuel injector replacement to a complete valve job because of a misfire. Clear the code, fill the tank with fresh gas, drive 200+ miles, still no misfire even in the pending codes. Diagnosis? Bad gas. Upstream O2 sensor code? Drive 25 miles at 65-75MPH on the interstate, then clear the code again if it pops up again. Drive normally. For me, the code never came back. Burned the gunk off the sensor. Then there's my truck... But I digress. Between the two mentioned problems I've saved I don't know how much money, but it's been totally worth it!

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What do you recommend for someone who uses an iphone and a mac?

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@peacenhim4u: Buy a real phone. (You know, the same advice Apple tells to people who want to use any of Apple's services on another phone! ;) )

Joking aside, I'm pretty sure there's iphone versions, just google it.

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@furbearingmammal: Yeah, my car gets the dreaded p0420 code every few months. I add a half bottle of techron and turn the code off and it rarely comes back for a significant amount of time. I know my catalytic converter is good because I replaced it a few years ago and don't drive much.

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These are a must own for any Euro car owner. Those cars tend to be over engineered to the point where they have sensors for everything and at times they aren't very clear. Taking a car into the shop and paying some ridiculous fee just to find out your gas cap wasn't screwed on tight enough or something simple that a scanner like this could decipher the error code.